Book Review – Heat Rises by Richard Castle

Review of: Heat Rises
Author:
Richard Castle
Price:
$7.59

Reviewed by:
Rating:
4
On 2014-07-06
Last modified:2014-07-06

Summary:

The mystery plotline is very good (as it was in the previous books) but some of the personal life plotline was annoying.

Heat Rises by Richard Castle

Heat Rises by Richard Castle

The blurb says:

The bizarre murder of a parish priest at a New York bondage club opens Nikki Heat’s most thrilling and dangerous case so far, pitting her against New York’s most vicious drug lord, an arrogant CIA contractor, and a shadowy death squad out to gun her down. And that is just the tip of an iceberg that leads to a dark conspiracy reaching all the way to the highest level of the NYPD. But when she gets too close to the truth, Nikki finds herself disgraced, stripped of her badge, and out on her own as a target for killers with nobody she can trust. Except maybe the one man in her life who’s not a cop. Reporter Jameson Rook. In the midst of New York’s coldest winter in a hundred years, there’s one thing Nikki is determined to prove: Heat Rises.

Something I’ve noticed about both the Castle TV show and this series of books is that Heat (and to a lesser extent her colleagues) are waaay too ethical.  It makes sense in the context because Castle would want to portray them in a good light, but the lack of flaws makes the characters less compelling.

Like the Bones series, this book had a few times when a character is misunderstanding something another character is doing, and you can see how it’s all going wrong and there’s nothing you can do to stop it and it’s just a misunderstanding and it’s aggravating.  It makes the character look stupid for not seeing the obvious, and it gets on my nerves.

There was a bunch of corny wordplay in the book that is consistent with it having been written by Castle, as well as references to the Castle TV show, Firefly etc.  They were mostly charming.

There were some technical issues with the ebook – I think the ebook version must have come from a manuscript laid out for paper because some words were split on syllable boundaries as you would do when the last word on a page is too long to fit.

The mystery plotline is very good (as it was in the previous books) but some of the personal life plotline was annoying for the reasons I’ve mentioned.